THE YORUBA PEOPLE`S RELIGIOUS BELIEFS IN THE FACE

THE YORUBA PEOPLE’SRELIGIOUS BELIEFS IN THE FACE

OF MODERN RELIGIONS

Unit

The Yoruba people are an ethnic group living in several countries inWest and South-Western Africa including Ghana, Benin, EquatorialGuinea and Nigeria.1In Nigeria, the group is more pronounced as it represents a hugepercentage of the population. For centuries, the Yoruba people hadpracticed their traditional religion without a hindrance. However,with the arrival of traders, missionaries, and colonizers, many ofthem converted to Christianity and Islam.2These interactions with new religions have had mutualinfluence.3Nonetheless, a significant number of Yoruba people practice theirtraditional religion alongside one of the modern religions. Thecoming of new religions thus offered new points of comparison.

Essentially, Islamintroduced the Arabic language before Western education came intoplace. The language provided a way of recording and transmitting theYoruba culture alongside religion to later generations.4With the arrival of European colonizers, the Yoruba culture did notdie but rather increased its reach across the Atlantic to countrieslike Haiti, Cuba, Brazil and Trinidad and Tobago through the slavetrade.5Furthermore, Christianity and Islam presented parallel ideologies onthe existence of a supreme being same as other traditional religions.

Some past scholars have portrayed traditional African religiousbeliefs as inferior or pagan.6However, the majority of modern African scholars argue that allfaiths are equal and legitimate participants in interreligiousdebates.7Ideally, the Yoruba religion shares similar views on given conceptssuch as morality, God, and evil.8Where differences exist, the Yoruba people have embraced them andallowed individuals to practice multiple beliefs.9

Thus, the goal is to prove that modern religions do not invalidatethe traditional Yoruba religious beliefs and culture because the twohave charted a new way of coexisting. One way of doing this would beto look at how modern religions have adopted some Yoruba traditionalbeliefs and practices. The second way would be to examine how theYoruba people have incorporated modern religious beliefs in theirtraditional religious beliefs and practices. Evidence will be sourcedfrom current and relevant scholarly literature on the topic.

Bibliography

Adamo, David,“Christianity and the African Traditional Religion(s): ThePostcolonial Round of

Engagement,”International Review of Mission 32, no.1 (2011): 105-113.

Fatokun, Samson,“Christian Missions in South-Western Nigeria, and the Response ofAfrican

TraditionalReligion,” International Review of Mission 96, no. 380,(2007): 105–113

Ogunleye, Richard,“Covenant-Keeping among the Yoruba People: A Critique ofSocio-Political

Transformation in Nigeria,” International Journal of Humanitiesand Social Science 3 no. 9 (2013): 81-85.

Oladiti, Akeem,“Reconsidering the influence of Islam on Yoruba cultural heritage,1930-

1987,”AmericanInternational Journal of Social Science 3, no. 6, (2014): 36-47.

Omobola, Odejobi,“Influence of Yoruba Culture in Christian Religious Worship,”International

J. Soc. Sci. &ampEducation 4, no. 3 (2014): 584-595.

Oti, Adepeju andOyebola Ayeni, “Yoruba Culture of Nigeria: Creating Space for anEndangered

Specie,”Cross-Cultural Communication 9, no. 4 (2013): 23-29

Ogunbado, Ahamad,“Impacts of Colonialism on Religions: An Experience ofSouth-Western

Nigeria,” Journalof Humanities and Social Science 5, no. 6 (2012): 51-57

1. David Adamo, “Christianity and the African Traditional Religion(s): The Postcolonial Round of Engagement,” International Review of Mission 32, no.1 (2011): 105-113.

2. Akeem Oladiti, “Reconsidering the Influence of Islam on Yoruba Cultural Heritage, 1930-1987,” American International Journal of Social Science 3, no. 6 (2014): 36.

3. Odejobi Omobola, “Influence of Yoruba Culture in Christian Religious Worship,” International J. Soc. Sci. &amp Education. 4, no. 3 (2014):584.

4. Akeem 36.

5. Adepeju Oti and Oyebola Ayeni, “Yoruba Culture of Nigeria: Creating Space for an Endangered Specie,” Cross-Cultural Communication 9, no. 4 (2013): 24.

6. Samson Fatokun, “Christian Missions in South-Western Nigeria, and the Response of African Traditional Religion,” International Review of Mission 96, no. 380 (2007): 106.

7. David Adamo, “Christianity and the African traditional religion(s): The postcolonial round of engagement,” International Review of Mission 32, no. 1(2011): 4.

8. Richard Ogunleye, “Covenant-Keeping among the Yoruba People: A Critique of Socio-Political Transformation in Nigeria,” International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 3, no. 9 (2011): 82.

9. Ahamad Ogunbado, “Impacts of Colonialism on Religions: An Experience of South-western Nigeria,” Journal of Humanities and Social Science 5, no. 6 (2012): 52.