One Small Cat that Killed Subject

OneSmall Cat that Killed

Subject

OneSmall Cat that Killed

Anethical dilemma is a situation where there occurs the conflictbetween the moral principles and the ethical decisions. This case isusually evident in the medical fields with the caregivers, patientsand either the patient’s families or acquaintances involved. In ourcase, we will evaluate the ethical surrounding the case of a farmerwho suffered due to the decision that was taken by his caregiver.(Hall, M.A., Bobinski, M.A., &amp Orentlicher, D.,2008) Therefore,this case study gives us a detailed explanation on how mattersrelated to the ethical dilemma get handled.

Thepatient was a farmer who complained of an ankle pain after a minoraccident. However, the caregiver just tells him to go and getassisted with specific prescriptions from the pharmacy. The doctorsees that the farmer is not sick thus he assumes that the patient(the farmer) does not need a thorough diagnosis and thus a minorprescription from general checkup can work. (Hall et al.,2008)Theassumption brings about the ethical dilemma since it leads to thepatient’s predicament. Thus we need to draw the boundary betweenthe ethical decisions and the moral principles.

Here,we understand that the doctor has already made the prescription fromhis analysis and check up on the patient. However, we then questionon the procedure that the physician followed in prescribing theappropriate medication on the patient. The victim’s family mightwant to see the justification of the prescription that the doctorgiven the patient. However, we know there are categories of diagnosesthat can be used on the patients before they get the medication andthe caregiver actually could have just one of them- general check upon the patient’s condition, and this has brought suffering on thepatient’s end. ( Orentlicher et al.,2008) That is where the moralprinciples and the ethical decisions by the caregiver do conflict.

References

Hall,M.A., Bobinski, M.A., &amp Orentlicher, D. (2008). Medical Liabilityand Treatment Relationships (p.274-303, 2nd Ed). New York: AspenPublishers