Causes of the Civil War

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Causesof the Civil War

FreeSoil Party

TheFree Soil Party was a political movement in the United States, whichparticipated in only two elections, 1848 and 1852. The party wasformed in the state of New York, where it enjoyed significantsupport. The party`s dominant ideology revolved around slavery. Itwas established by some of the primary opponents of slave labor fromthe two largest parties (the Whigs and the Democrats). It aimed atcurtailing the spread of slave power in the western states, which wasfavored by the northern territories (Blight, 2016). Their dogma wasa free man on free soil results into a superior social, economic andpolitical system.

Therefore,emerging sentiments and divergent views about slavery in the mainpolitical parties led to the formation of the free soil party.Although it did not last for long, it signified that slave labor wasan important political issue in the American society. This is becauseleaders from both divides defected from their affiliations due tocommon views about the expansion of slavery. While it had nosignificance in the presidential election, its elected leaders in theUS Congress had an enormous influence, despite their small number.They ensured that the antislavery debate did not fade away, inaddition to persuading other politicians to decamp to the newpolitical outfit that pushed for a free nation. Therefore, the mainlegacy of the party was convincing the Whigs to form the RepublicanParty (Blight, 2016).

Inits political actions, the party was faced with several challenges.For example, its activities and lobbies were negatively influenced bythe Compromise of 1850, which resulted in the loss of support amongopinion makers. Additionally, the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 servedas the final blow to the party. Nonetheless, its mission was achievedin the long run due to the political divide that was initiated by theFree Soil Party (Blight, 2016).

Reference

Blight,D. (2016). hist-119:The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1845-1877,http://oyc.yale.edu/transcript/549/hist-119