Annotated bibliography

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Author’sname

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Womenin science

Gornick,V. (2013). Womenin Science: Then and Now.New York: The Feminist Press at CUNY.

Thereare still barriers involved throughout women’s course of study andthe time they get employed. For instance, they have been paid less,fewer promotions, and hold smaller number leadership positions.

Pearson,W., Frehill, L. M., &amp McNeely, C. L. (2015). AdvancingWomen in Science: An International Perspective.New York: Springer.

Thearticle delves into globalization, the social composition of science,and prejudiced societal relationships in addressing the issue ofwomen’s involvement in science. The authors stipulate that genderbias and segregation have consistently barred women from pursuingscience.

Castillo,R., Grazzi, M., &amp Tacsir, E. (2014). Women in Science andTechnology. Inter-AmericanDevelopment Bank,1-32.

Thearticle recognizes the increase in women’s participation in STEM.Nevertheless, there is a significant under-representation resultingfrom gender discrimination. The article suggests policies to promotemore women in the sciences.

Dimitriadi,A. (2013). Young women in science and technology: the importance ofchoice. Journalof Innovation and Entrepreneurship,2-5.

Thearticle expounds on various factors that take precedence among youngwomen when choosing their studies. Women’s judgment on a careerpath faces clouded notion that sciences favor male students.

Linková,M., &amp Červinková, A. (2011). What matters to women in science?Gender, power and bureaucracy. EuropeanJournal of Women`s Studies, 18 (3),215-230.

Theauthors state that under-representation of women in science is stillprevalent despite improvements in the academics. Genderdiscrimination is one of the leading factors on STEM disparities.

Ahmed,H. (2016, May 3). Weneed to do more for women in science, Science Mag.Retrieved October 3, 2016, from Science Mag Website:http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/05/we-need-do-more-women-science

Theauthor asserts there is a wide spread of sexism when it comes toeducating the girl child in science or engineering subjects.Lecturers have become biased and judgmental about the potential ofwomen in science.

Fine,M. (2015). More Women Earning Science Degrees. TheHuffington Post,1-3. Retrieved fromhttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/melanie-fine/more-women-earning-science-degrees_b_7973416.html

Theauthor expresses her concern over the rising unemployment rate ofwomen pursuing science. There is a substantial imbalance of women tomen in the workplace. Moreover, the few women who get employment,suffer from poor remuneration.

Pollack,A. (2013). Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? TheNew York Times,1-2. Retrieved fromhttp://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/06/magazine/why-are-there-still-so-few-women-in-science.html

Theauthor cites lack of encouragement from lecturers and extreme bias onwomen in science as a major contributor of the statistics. Women lackrole models in science studies.

Feltman,R. (2016). Calculus apprehensions may steer women away from sciencecareers. TheWashington Post,1-5. Retrieved fromhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2016/07/14/calculus-apprehensions-may-steer-women-away-from-science-careers/

Theauthor attributes certain subjects to the divergence of women fromscience studies. Calculus could be one of the leaky points for genderbias in science.

Bibliography

Ahmed, H. (2016, May 3). We need to do more for women in science, Science Mag. Retrieved October 3, 2016, from Science Mag Website: http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/05/we-need-do-more-women-science

Castillo, R., Grazzi, M., &amp Tacsir, E. (2014). Women in Science and Technology. Inter-American Development Bank, 1-32.

Dimitriadi, A. (2013). Young women in science and technology: the importance of choice. Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, 2-5.

Feltman, R. (2016). Calculus apprehensions may steer women away from science careers. The Washington Post, 1-5.

Fine, M. (2015). More Women Earning Science Degrees. The Huffington Post, 1-3.

Gornick, V. (2013). Women in Science: Then and Now. New York: The Feminist Press at CUNY.

Linková , M., &amp Červinková, A. (2011). What matters to women in science? Gender, power and bureaucracy. European Journal of Women`s Studies, 18 (3), 215-230.

Pearson, W., Frehill, L. M., &amp McNeely, C. L. (2015). Advancing Women in Science: An International Perspective. New York: Springer.

Pollack, A. (2013). Why Are There Still So Few Women in Science? The New York Times, 1-2.